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History of the TNA Immortal Jeff Hardy Championship Belt




The TNA Immortal Championship belt was used by TNA Wrestling to promote the character of "The Charismatic Enigma" Jeff Hardy. The belt was first unveiled in the UK at a live event in Manchester on November 10, 2004, where Hardy defeated Abyss and A-1 to become the first TNA Immortal Champion. In this blog, we take a look at the history, design and legacy of this iconic belt.

When Was the TNA Immortal Title Belt Released?

The first and only instance of the Immortal Title Belt was at the end of 2016 when TNA gave the belt to Jeff Hardy after he won it at Victory Road. This was done in order to signify a clean break from the “Broken Universe” storyline, which involved Matt Hardy’s “Woken” character, and had been the centre of TNA’s programming for several months.


The belt was retired at the end of 2016 when the company decided to bring the TNA World Heavyweight Championship back in early 2017, just as they had done with the X-Division Title.


The Design of the TNA Immortal Title

The Immortal Title Belt was created as a direct response to the Broken Hardys storyline that had taken over the company by late 2016. The belt was designed to look like it was just thrown together out of spare parts in a hurry, like Jeff’s character at the time. The centre of the belt is a spiderweb-patterned lace-up leather strap, which is supposed to be reminiscent of a baseball or football glove. This is attached to a simple metal plate that reads “IMMORTAL.”


The plates on this belt are all black, which makes it a little difficult to see the text sometimes. The rest of the belt is made up of random pieces of jewels and other materials, which are held together by pieces of orange and blue string. The pieces are all jagged and uneven, like something that was cobbled together in a hurry. The Immortal Title Belt is supposed to look like a hastily thrown-together creation. It was designed for Jeff Hardy’s character at the time. The belt was designed to look like it was just thrown together out of spare parts in a hurry, like Jeff’s character at the time.


The Return of the Immortal Title

The TNA World Heavyweight Champion at the time, Drew Galloway, lost the belt to Bobby Lashley at the same event where Jeff Hardy would unify the titles. This meant that the company was once again out of heavyweight title belts to give to the winner of their upcoming show.


In order to avoid the necessity of coming up with yet another belt design, TNA decided to give Jeff Hardy the Immortal Title again. However, since this belt was already retired, they had to create a new title belt, hence the TNA World Heavyweight Championship was once again designated as the primary title in the company.


Hardy’s Last Defence and Retirement of the Belt

Jeff Hardy defended this belt at March 3, 2017, Impact Wrestling tapings against his brother Matt Hardy. Although the two were put into a feud as part of the build-up to this match, the decision was made to retire the Immortal Title Belt following the event.


This decision came from Jeff himself. Having just returned from an extended departure from pro wrestling due to injury, Jeff Hardy was scheduled to once again take some time off following this event. He decided that it might be confusing for fans to see two different title belts and decided to retire the Immortal Title and make the TNA World Heavyweight Championship the primary title again.


Why Did TNA Retire This Belt?

This decision was made largely because of practical reasons. After the return of Jeff Hardy, there was a period of time where he was working both Impact Wrestling and Ring of Honour, a touring promotion that he owned part of at the time. Hardy brought his own belt with him to ROH, but he wasn’t supposed to be using that belt in TNA.


He was still able to defend the belt in ROH because it was his own company, but TNA was under no obligation to let him use his own belt for the company. As a result, Hardy was only able to defend the belt in TNA for a few months before he left to focus on his ROH obligations again. The belt needed to be retired so that someone else could challenge for the title.


With the Immortal Title retired and the company once again without a designated World title, the TNA World Heavyweight Championship was brought back with its original design. This was done at the same event that saw Jeff Hardy lose the belt to his brother Matt.


The belt was recycled to become the TNA World Heavyweight Championship once again because of the continuity of the title’s design. The original TNA World Heavyweight Championship belt design was used since it had been in use since 2002, as opposed to the Immortal Title, which had only existed for a few months at that point.


Where You Can Find It Today

The TNA World Heavyweight Championship has been in use since March 3, 2017, when the belt was brought back with a slightly updated design. This design is the same belt that the company has been using since 2002 when it was known as the NWA/TNA Heavyweight title.


The original NWA/TNA title belt was designed by the same belt-maker who created the WCW, WWE, and WWF titles throughout the 1980s and 1990s. The belt was designed to look like a title belt should: It’s large, imposing, and covered in gold. The belt is 24” long and approximately 7” wide. It weighs around 7 pounds, which might sound like a lot, but it’s actually pretty light for a title belt. The belt was designed to resemble a championship belt should: large, imposing, and covered in gold.


The TNA World Heavyweight Championship is currently held by Austin Aries, who won it at Bound for Glory in October of 2018.



This belt is an iconic design in the world of professional wrestling and has become an important part of TNA history. It’s the only design that’s been used by the company since day one, and it’s the only design they’ve ever planned to use. You can get a replica of the TNA World Heavyweight Championship belt from our website. Liked this article? Leave a comment below!

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